FUJIKINA 2017 with Craig Robertson - Part 2

In January, local X-Photographer Craig Robertson accompanied the FUJIFILM NZ team to FUJIKINA 2017. Craig was tasked with getting some hands on experience with the X-T20, the X100F and the XF50mm F2 lens, to give us some honest feedback on what to expect from these new additions to to the FUJIFILM line up.

If you missed it already you can check out Craig’s review on the X-T20 here,

Up next, the X100F!

Almost six years ago Fujifilm began a revolution and the rise of its “X-series” cameras with the release of the X100. Four generations later the X100F is simply outstanding.

I have to be honest - I’ve never owned one. I’ve used the 100S, the T and now the F and every time I wish I did own one. The trouble is there are always other things on my Fujifilm wishlist that I "need” as a professional photographer and the X100 is just a personal “want” so never quite makes it to the top of my list. In some ways I just “want" one because they look so damn cool. That classic rangefinder design - you just can’t go past it.

One thing I particularly love about the X100 cameras is the way they force you to work with their single 23mm focal length. It disciplines you to see better. You zoom with you feet and you learn to know what will work compositionally before you even bring the camera to your eye. I think this helps you to instinctively to see great pictures - especially in a street photography situation where you need to react fast. A fleeting moment is gone if you muck around with changing, or even having to think about, focal lengths. Unquestionably, the X100 makes you a better photographer.

Fujifilm have done a superb job of building all their camera’s so you can switch from one model to the next without having to think. Most of the buttons, dials and menu items are all in the same place. Your “muscle memory” takes you instinctively to the right buttons and dials to operate their X cameras. You barely have to think about what camera you are using so that means special moments are not lost while you fiddle with controls. Fujifilm have improved that even further with the X100F placing all the main control buttons on the right side of the LCD, including the new focus lever control, so you can easily operate the camera with one hand. Standardising the battery with the same NP-W126 battery as the other X cameras is also a great move - no more taking different batteries or chargers away with you.

Speaking of standardisation - that brings me to the sensor… It’s the same superb 24.3 megapixel X-Trans sensor as in the X-T2, X-T20 and the X-Pro2. For the photographer that means you get the same stunning image quality and colour across the range - and that really does make a difference when you’re shooting with multiple camera bodies on a job.

On all Fujifilm’s other X series cameras I love the electronic finder and the fact what you see is what you get. With X100F's hybrid viewfinder I prefer to use the optical finder - I think this is mainly because I’ve used it for street photography and having that little bit of additional space outside of the bright frame helps you to anticipate action - for example - you can see exactly when a person is about to walk into the background you’ve seen, creating the perfect moment as they walk into the frame.


There are are still a few things I’d personally like to see on the next generation X100 camera. It could do with a little bit more of a thumb grip at the back - sometimes the 100F just lacks a little purchase in your hand and I felt like I might drop it; I’d love it to be weather proof especially since it’s such a great travel camera; and I’d love it to have a tilt screen for inconspicuous waist level street shooting. Maybe then it would fall into my “need” list! But regardless - I still want one!


To hear more from Craig and other X Photographers, or to just keep an eye on dates and details for these upcoming releases make sure to follow us on Facebook - join the X Community page here or subscribe to our monthly newsletter here.





    No items found.